Inspire Your Dog Border Collie Working Sheepdog Sheep Dog Training Help Advice Behavioural Health Floss Tricolour Cattle Dog Hero

Hero Files: Floss

“It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog.”

― Mark Twain

FLOSS

Floss01Floss is a little collie bitch who was rescued in Ireland. When she arrived with the rescue she was absolutely terrified of people. She had been badly abused in the past and had no reason to give her trust or love to any human. After a time, she realised that not all people would hurt her, however she still very nervous and would avoid people, especially men, where ever she could. Floss found a home with a lovely lady and her other collie. When Floss' mum got married they all went to live on a sheep and cattle farm - and Floss found her place in life! She was in her element working the cattle with her Mum. Although Floss was eventually comfortable to be around her new Dad she was still her Mum's dog and would follow her everywhere. She wouldn't work for her Dad, only her Mum, and barely left her side.

One day Floss and her Mum were in the kitchen in the farmhouse getting lunch ready. Her Dad was up the farmyard, about a mile away.

Suddenly Floss jumped up and cocked her head to one side, quick as a flash she shot out of the back door, through the garden and was out along the lane heading for the farmyard. Her Mum couldn't quite believe what was happening and was quickly in pursuit calling her. Floss ignored her calls and carried on at high speed towards the farmyard.

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Inspire Your Dog Border Collie Working Sheepdog Sheep Dog Training Help Advice Behavioural Health Tally

Rehoming Files: Tally Tots

Every dog isn't a growler, and every growler isn't a dog.

- Unknown

Tally01Tally was what we described as a grumpy old bat - but in the most loving way possible.

Tally came to us because she'd become very protective of her mum. After losing her husband, Tally's mum was finding it more and more difficult to handle Tally. Tally had taken on the responsibility of looking after her mum, and the cat that loved with them.

If Tally's mum went up ladders to put up decorations, Tally would get very stressed, worried something would happen. The situation came to a head Tally's mum fell in the street, and couldn't get back up - but no one could help her because Tally was protecting her from everyone.

It was a heartbreaking decision for her mum to let Tally leave the family to come to us. She was 9 years old, and had been with them since a pup. When Tally arrived with us, we also wondered whether it was the right decision. Tally did not trust us - and spent two days laying under the car. On the day she decided to come into the house, she pinned me up against the kitchen wall with her teeth bared. One wrong move, and there would have been a serious injury.

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Inspire Your Dog Border Collie Working Sheepdog Sheep Dog Training Help Advice Behavioural Health Tricolour Rags Raggy Dog

Rehoming Files: The Raggy Dog

If your dog doesn't like someone you probably shouldn't either.

- Unknown

Rags01Rags was a dog who came to us from another rescue. He was going to be put to sleep because he was too difficult, and couldn’t be rehomed. He had a fascination for pots and pans, and would throw them around. He’d poo everywhere and stamp it in - he was constantly wound up and frustrated.

We offered to take Rags on, and see if we could help him. In a lot of ways, Rags was like an anti-social teenager. If he could, he’d have locked himself in a room, drawn the curtains and put on depressing music. He wasn’t very far off self-harming himself.

Humans really held no interest for Rags, he had clearly had a bad time with them in the past, and really didn’t have any desire to interact. It was impossible to get a picture of Rags - whenever he spotted a camera, he would make himself scarce. So there wasn’t much we could do at this point for him; he didn’t care if we tried to play or interact with him. The only thing we could do is show him that he was safe and could relax.

In these situations, it’s often another dog that becomes a bridge between the scared dog and the humans… so enter stage left, Bobby.

Bobby01

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Inspire Your Dog Border Collie Working Sheepdog Sheep Dog Training Help Advice Behavioural Health Alfie Red and white

Rehoming Files: Alfie’s Choice

Every boy should have two things: a dog, and a mother willing to let him have one.

- Unknown

Alfie01Alfie was a beautiful spaniel cross collie with the most amazing eyes - they looked like he’d painstakingly applied eyeliner every morning. Coupled with his stunning red coat and bouncy personality, Alfie was the most lovely dog you could ever hope to meet.

A homecheck had been carried out for a potential adopter; she lived up in Northumberland, and had to make a six hour journey to come and meet him.

Alfie greeted her with his usual enthusiasm. He adored her dog, and was playing very well and interacting in all the ways you’d want a potential new home and dog to do.

Having spent a couple of hours getting to know him, we were all happy that this was the right home for Archie. We went through all the important information about him and it came to the moment where we were to say goodbye.

Alfie trotted quite happily up to the lady’s car, and jumped in. Her dog also jumped in. At that moment, Archie looked at us, at the lady, and then back at us. He consequently jumped out of the car, and ran back to the house, laying on the doorstep, putting his paws over his nose.

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Inspire Your Dog Border Collie Working Sheepdog Sheep Dog Training Help Advice Behavioural Health Tricolour Bobby

Rehoming Files: Bobby’s Business

There is only one smartest dog in the world, and every boy has it.

- Unknown

BOBBY

Sometimes, it doesn’t matter what we do as the homechecker, the dog will make their choice. They have an amazing ability to scope out the people they are meeting and act accordingly. Sometimes, they will just not gel with the person you’re homechecking, and on other occasions, they will make their opinion known in other, less subtle ways.

Bobby01Bobby was a large clown of a Collie dog. He was a big, tri-colour with a huge amount of fur that made him look like a colossal teddy bear. He was the most outgoing, large, happy idiot of a dog, whose idea of a good time was just bumbling around making people laugh. Bobby was a prime example of finding it difficult to home a fantastic dog, simply because he just seemed too good to be true.

Of course, it probably didn’t help that he had his own techniques to put any potential adopters off.

On several occasions, Bobby would conjure up mysterious maladies while people were visiting him. On one occasion, he spent the whole time scratching one ear, and looking generally miserable. “Oh dear, he doesn’t look very well. Has he got ear problems?”

On another, he developed a limp; but kept alternating which leg he was limping on, because he kept forgetting which one he was acting with. “Is he lame on both front legs?”

He even managed, of all things, to a fake a ‘squint’.

“Has he got something in his eyes?”

“Yes, mischief,” we replied.

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Inspire Your Dog Bus Stop

Rehoming Files: Busy Roads…

There's nowt so queer as folk.

- Old Welsh Saying

Alarm bells should ring when you do a homecheck for a friend of someone you know. For some reason, they always seem to go wrong one way or another.

We knocked on the door, and the lady warmly welcomed us in, taking us through the side-gate round to the conservatory.

Gate01They were an older couple, and they seemed nice enough, offering tea and biscuits. Their garden was largely secure but there was one concern; their gate was a very small wrought iron one; not only could a dog push through the gate itself, but it was so low anyone (even a toddler!) could reach through and open it. Unfortunately, their gate was directly opposite a bus stop, and when we arrived there were 10-15 school kids queueing for the bus.

“I’ll get the tea,” the lady said, disappearing into the house.

We carefully explained to the gentleman why we carry out homechecks, and then broached the subject of the gate and the bus stop.

Bus01“Unfortunately,” we said, “you can’t trust other people to behave these days. Any one of the kids at the bus stop could walk up and open the gate to let out a dog. It might be worth considering a gate that can’t be opened from the outside.”

Unfortunately, he didn’t see our point.

“We’ve lived here 40 years,” he said, dismissively, “and we’ve never had a problem.”

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Inspire Your Dog Poodle Dudley Curly Black Training Help Advice Behavioural Health

Rehoming Files: Poodle Alert!

"Raining Cats and Dogs"

- Proverb

Homechecks are a vital part of the adoption process.  Many years ago, we used to do homechecks with the potential adoptee in tow.

Monty01On some occasions, everything would go beautifully, and on others, the homecheck can just seem to lurch from one disaster to another.

We had the most lovely Poodle some to us called Monty. He was a big, black Standard Poodle, but had one vice - he really didn’t like cats.

However, a lovely couple who’d adopted from us before were besotted by Poodles, and really wanted Monty to meet them at home. They did have cats, but they assured us that the cats were more than savvy; one of their other poodles hated cats too.

Monty met their old poodle outside, and got on famously, and so we all retired to the house where Monty was allowed to have a good explore of the spacious open-plan living room and kitchen.

Everything was going very smoothly, until a cat sauntered into the room. There was a moment of complete stillness as the cat and Monty stared each other out. We started to move toward Monty to grab his lead…

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